Maps are built with layers. Each layer holds characteristics that may be of interest to end-users. Layers contain features of the map such as streets, parks, postal districts, cities, radio towers, rivers and so on. Each map layer sits on top of another layer, e.g. a country layer may sit all the way at the bottom with street layers sitting right at the top.

Layers can also be created dynamically from data found in external sources. Map Intelligence is capable of generating a variety of layer types to aid analysis.

In this manual, layers that reside as part of the mapping environment are referred to as Internal (built-in) layers . Layers created dynamically from external data sources using the MI Client are known as MI Custom layers.

The MI Viewer also allows the adding of external WMS Layers or Overlays and the creation of Visualization Layers.

 

Maps are built with layers. Each layer holds characteristics that may be of interest to end-users. Layers contain features of the map such as streets, parks, postal districts, cities, radio towers, rivers and so on. Each map layer sits on top of another layer, e.g. a country layer may sit all the way at the bottom with street layers sitting right at the top.

Layers can also be created dynamically from data found in external sources. Map Intelligence is capable of generating a variety of layer types to aid analysis.

In this manual, layers that reside as part of the mapping environment are referred to as Internal (built-in) layers . Layers created dynamically from external data sources using the MI Client are known as MI Custom layers.

The MI Viewer also allows the adding of external WMS Layers or Overlays and the creation of Visualization Layers.

 

Point Layers

Point Layers are map layers where data is represented on the map as discrete point images or symbols. For example: a particular layer might represent the location of stores as push-pin icons and another layer could represent accidents as colored dots, where the color (theme) represents the severity of the accident. Typically, the rows in a table of data belong to a business concept such as people or address details, where each column is an attribute of that concept. Thus each row in your business data can be represented as an individual point in a point layer. In Map Intelligence, point layers form the foundation for relationship layers.

 

 091216 Figure 02

Figure: The MI Viewer displaying a Point layer. The points, represented by colored circles, indicate the location of fast food outlets in the Sydney area.

Relationship Layers

Radius relationship layers are circular regions with themes around certain points of interest that show information about other points which fall within that circular region. These layers are generated by Map Intelligence. They are based on calculations made by Map Intelligence on the specified data values as defined by the Layer Designer. For example: different colored circles indicate the average house price within half a kilometer of a proposed waste plant. Another example is where different colored circles indicate the number of burglaries that have occurred within a five-mile distance of houses belonging to known burglars. In the current version of Map Intelligence, the circle center points (e.g.: houses belonging to known burglars) and the data being analyzed (burglaries), must be point layers.

 

091216 Figure 03
Figure: The MI Viewer displaying a Radius Relationship layer. The property symbol represent vacant properties suitable to open as a Fast Food outlet. Around each vacant outlet is a 3 km radius colored according to the most common type of fast food outlets in the area (competitors), themed according to the type of food sold. Purple Circles indicate the most common type of franchise is Ice Cream and red circles indicate Burger outlets.


A Region Relationship layer corresponds to a map area of any shape that is solely geographical in its definition, and is not generated by Map Intelligence. Examples would be suburbs, zip / postal codes, local government areas, or police precincts. Region Relationship layers can be given themes according to specified data rules associated with the points that fall within that region. An example of such a theme could be color-coding precincts according to the number of crimes that have taken place within their boundaries, or applying different hatches to suburbs based on the total value of house sales that have occurred in each one. Map Intelligence works out in which region a point (e.g. a sale or an accident) physically belongs to by doing a spatial calculation.

 

091216 Figure 04


Figure: The MI Viewer displaying a Region Relationship layer. Local Government Areas of Sydney are color-coded according to the most common type of fast food outlets in each area. Yellow areas show chicken outlets are the most common, red areas = burger and blue areas = pizza.

Join Layers

Join Layers correspond to regions, lines or points existing in a map. As with other MI Custom Layers, the displayed theme is based on data attribute values, but in this case no spatial calculation is used. Instead, a column in your business data is designated to have values that match a column in the map data. For example for Region Join Layers, an existing map layer of suburbs may correspond to a data column for suburbs where the values are the suburb names. Then, for transaction data that represents customer complaints and that also contains a suburb column, it is possible to make a cross-reference between the transaction and the map area using the suburb name. An example that would use this correlation is displaying a theme on a suburb’s area on the map that reflects the most common complaint type received from that suburb.

 

091216 Figure 05
Figure: Region Join Layer - In this example the regions are color coded according to the most common type of complaint in the region.

This same logic applies to both points and lines already existing in the map, in the case of Line Join Layers, an existing map layer of Highways with a specific identifier may correspond to the same in your business data of volume of traffic per hour. An example would be to use this correlation in displaying a theme on the highway that reflects the volume of traffic per hour.

 

091216 Figure 06
Figure: Line Join Layer Map View and Legend showing Specific Color Theme. In this example railway lines are color coded according to the number of faults on sections of the track. Other examples of lines are roads, electricity cables, and sewers.



091216 Figure 07

Figure: Point Join Layer - In this example railway stations are themed according to station restroom facilities (No Restroom, Restroom or Restroom with wheelchair access). The location of the railway station is in the map data and the restroom information is in the business data, using the Join Layer you can bring both sets of data together.


Like Internal (built-in) map layers, MI Custom layers also have a specific order in which they are placed on the map. Point layers are placed on top of Radius Relationship layers, which in turn sit on top of the Internal (built-in) map layers. Region Relationship and Join layers shade existing Internal (built-in) layers.

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